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For my Fall 2018 collection, I found inspiration in the transition between summer and fall in New England, layering warm and cool weather pieces in colors and fabrics appropriate for both seasons. The collection focuses on two simple shapes made up in both new (domestically milled, organic) and vintage fabrics, embellished with handcraft techniques that utilize recycled materials. The silhouettes and imagery featured reference intersections between the geometric and organic, using a variety of modified circle, arc, and grid motifs. On several seersucker T-shirts, flat bottomed circles represent the sun on the horizon. Texture, rust dyed stripes adorn mini skirts in a grid pattern. Each piece is a conversation between opposite elements: dyed and undyed fabric, right and wrong sides, wovens and knits. Several pieces feature fabric woven by hand from my studio offcuts in a palette to match the rest of the garments.

To make many of the pieces in the collection, I collaborated with Natural Dyer Amy Lou Stein to dye custom textiles using plants, flowers, and even rusted objects, many of which came from Stein’s own neighborhood in Somerville, MA. I also worked with farmer Katy Riley of Tree House Farms to create felt jewelry and embellishments handmade from her sheep’s wool.

Runway

Slow fashion often utilizes creativity and resourcefulness as a way to cultivate an exciting and stylish wardrobe with a smaller footprint. For this runway show, part of the Future Forecast event, I took an editorial approach, mixing in pieces from other sustainable designers and boutiques, vintage pieces, as well as items from my own wardrobe and the wardrobes of the models (and in some cases, items hand made by the models themselves!) To learn more about each look and the event where the runway show took place, click here.

 

Editorial

Photos by Monika Rivard

 
 
 

Process