Introducing: Geodesic

I'm super excited to share this pattern with you all. And I have been for a long time.

Find Geodesic Here!

Let me explain...

When I first launched Blueprints, I envisioned a garment inspired by a geodesic dome and started on its development, but eventually decided that having Cabin be the first release was the way to go. After Cabin was released, I revisited my little geodesic idea and started creating prototypes and doing research.

Some quick background on the geodesic dome:

The geodesic dome was popularized by Buckminster Fuller, who saw it as an appealing building method that created an incredibly strong and stable structure for its weight. Fuller envisioned it as a solution to a post war shortage of homes (he had a penchant for problem solving, the Dymaxion House being an earlier rethinking of housing) but it's lightweight construction and speedy prefabrication made it most appealing for large structures.

Without getting too mathematical, the dome starts with an icosahedron (a shape with 20 sides). To make it more like a sphere, the number of triangles increases. Something about the triangular structure is incredibly strong, but I'd recommend asking an engineer why. Something about making a sphere (or half sphere, like the dome) out of triangles is appealing to me in a way beyond math and science.

Creating Geodesic was neither true pattern making nor math problem. It was something in between. Since Fall of 2014, I've gone through several different prototypes that eventually evolved into the pattern you see today. The idea was to design something that used only one pattern piece: an equilateral triangle like the ones used in a geodesic dome. This of course presented several problems, both of mathematical and stylistic origin.

I was never a math person. But of course, in the typical twist, I ended up creating patterns, which utilizes tons of math, specifically fractions, percentages and geometry. Through pattern making, I feel like I picked up a lot of the math literacy I missed out on in school and have actually grown to really enjoy it! Though it was a bit daunting trying to figure out how to adapt the dome concept to a pattern.

I figured out several things though the prototyping process that went on to inform the final pattern. I could create different sized tops by simply increasing the size of the triangle, but it made grading a bit of a challenge, since human bodies grow at different proportional rates than the triangle shape. I ended up including a side panel half triangle that would create the right body width, without the length and neckline getting way too big and allow for easier alteration. Since the triangle arms had been quite bulky, I decided to scrap them in favor of a raglan sleeve that would set in along the diagonal edge of the top row of triangles.

Another prototype using polar fleece, which was scrapped for bulkiness. I still think it could work (In fact, I lined my tunic pockets with it and one of my testers sewed up a fleece version that she loved!) Polar fleece is made here in Massachusetts, often using recycled fiber, so I feel like it deserves another chance.

Another prototype using polar fleece, which was scrapped for bulkiness. I still think it could work (In fact, I lined my tunic pockets with it and one of my testers sewed up a fleece version that she loved!) Polar fleece is made here in Massachusetts, often using recycled fiber, so I feel like it deserves another chance.

I also played around with a zip pocket. I still like this idea, so I plan to revisit it in some additions for the Geodesic pattern that will be available next month (wink wink!)

I also played around with a zip pocket. I still like this idea, so I plan to revisit it in some additions for the Geodesic pattern that will be available next month (wink wink!)

After releasing A-frame, then Saltbox, I thought it was time to revisit Geodesic. I spent the winter in my (sometimes cozy) studio making a few muslins of geodesic 3.0 while working on other projects. I also worked out a variation on a typical sweatshirt pocket, built into the triangles. I sewed up the tunic length in a bright coral sweatshirt fleece. I wasn't originally envisioning this pattern for knits, but once it occurred to me, I couldn't really picture it in anything else.

I wanted to have a 2nd variation in the pattern and personally don't wear a lot of long tops. As a high-waisted skirt/pants wearer, I thought a cropped version could be awesome as well! So I sewed one up for fun in a beautiful hemp sweatshirt fleece that I only had 3/4 yard of (I squeezed nearly all the pieces in, only having to piece the neckline) and I loved it.

Both these new protoypes felt right. They felt wearable. And I found myself wearing them constantly, which is a good sign!

The cropped version feels like the perfect thing to throw on for a little extra warmth. In the colder months, I wore it a lot over button down shirts,

The cropped version feels like the perfect thing to throw on for a little extra warmth. In the colder months, I wore it a lot over button down shirts,

It's also perfect to wear with my recently finished Ginger Jeans!

It's also perfect to wear with my recently finished Ginger Jeans!

So once all the technical work was done, my mind started swimming with all sorts of patchwork possibilities! I'm a big fan of stash busting patterns (Like A-Frame & Saltbox) and Geodesic fits right in with the lineup! The construction allows you to be pretty economical with your fabric and is great for using up knit (or woven) scraps.
You can find Geodesic here!

My pattern testers played around with some awesome fabrics and had me feeling really inspired. Did I mention how grateful I am to the amazing pattern testers I worked with? Couldn't have done it without them!

Find Geodesic Here!

I'll be highlighting some of their makes in a later blog post and look forward to sharing some fun extras for Geodesic, including that zip pocket pictured above and a few other goodies! All in all, I think Bucky would approve.